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Brutal ancient mass sacrifice REVEALED: Sick priests ripped out hearts of children

Evidence of the largest single incident of mass child sacrifice by members of the sprawling ancient Chimú Empire where up to 140 children and 200 young llamas were killed. The children were between five to 14 years, according to reports. While incidents of human sacrifice among the Aztec, Maya, and Inca have been recorded in scientific excavations, this discovery in the little-known pre-Columbian Chimú civilization is “unprecedented in the Americas—if not in the entire world”. EPA MASS KILLING: The remains of three adults were also found in close proximity EPA BRUTAL: More than 140 children of the Chimu Empire may have had there hearts ripped out “I, for one, never expected it” John VeranoThe skeletal remains of both children and animals show evidence of cuts to ribs, suggesting the that the victims’ chests were cut open and pulled apart, “perhaps to facilitate the removal of the heart”, noted the publication. The remains of three adults—a man and two women—were found in close proximi..

All Aboard with Science Channel’s New Series IMPOSSIBLE ENGINEERING: EXTREME RAILROADS Premiering 5/1

Since their spectacular RISE in the 19th century, railroads have been at the cutting edge of engineering and technology and that remains true, even today. IMPOSSIBLE ENGINEERING: EXTREME RAILROADS, premiering Thursday, May 17 at 10pm ET/PT, shines a light on the world's most extraordinary rail systems, including New York's Arthur Kill Vertical Lift Bridge, Japan's Bullet Train and California's Central Pacific Railroad. IMPOSSIBLE ENGINEERING: EXTREME RAILROADS highlights the historic and modern breakthroughs of railroad production by telling the stories of bold PIONEERS and the Science behind their incredible engineering feats. High-tech graphic animation will detail each transportation marvel and will look at the engineering challenges that each railway faces. IMPOSSIBLE ENGINEERING: EXTREME RAILROADS explores: · Incredible mountain railways that conquer vertiginous heights and offer breathtaking views, including Britain's Snowdon Mountain Railway and Californ..

Trip to Cascadia Cave brings archaeology to life for Eugene festivalgoers

Dylan Darling @DylanJDarling SWEET HOME — Only some of the petroglyphs catch the eye right away. So Tony Farqué held up a flashlight and clicked the button to trigger a strobe. Light flickered on the rock wall towering above him, revealing a hidden tapestry of carvings. Farqué said the strobe light mimics the glow of pitch torches used by Native Americans who carved the mysterious etchings in the rock thousands of years ago. "This is the largest and most complete rock art site in Western Oregon by far," said Farqué, archaeologist for the Sweet Home Ranger District of the Willamette National Forest. "There is a lot here." During the past 25 years, Farqué has led the hike to Cascadia Cave more than 450 times, introducing about 8,500 people to the special place. The site is about 60 miles northeast of Eugene off Highway 20. Most of the 10 people who joined Farqué on Friday were part of The Archaeology Channel International Film Festival in Eugene. The festival is in its 15th year, and..

Miscreants rob historic tomb’s majesty

RAJKOT: The majestic sight of Mahabat Khan Makabra, the 19th century mausoleum right in the heart of town, leaves outsiders visiting Junagadh for the first time spellbound. Standing tall on a sprawling ground, the 120-year-old mausoleum is one of the most prominent monuments of the Mughal era rulers of Junagadh who had initially acceded to Pakistan but later agreed to merge it into India post-Independence. But walk closer to it and the mesmerising sight turns into sorrow within a few minutes. Several integral parts of this Indo-European architectural wonder with Islamic wonder lie in shambles. The intricately carved grills are shattered and some silver doors have actually been stolen or just silver taken away from some of them along with the gold canopy. There is no one to stop you from doing anything here. In the night, chances are strong that one may find Bachhus gulping down country-made liquor or even gambling. Though the main door of the mausoleum is locked, there is free ent..

Sculptures in Archaeological Museum not properly stored: CAG

The sculptures housed in the State Archaeological Museum were being stored improperly, said the Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) of India in its report. The audit report on West Bengal's general and social sector for the year 2015-16 said the government had not formulated any guideline or manual on operation of the archaeological museums or archives. Prolonged exposure to un-optimised temperature and humidity coupled with improper storage was affecting the conditions of antiquities, especially the metallic ones, the report said. The State Archaeological Museum maintained a reserve of 36,931 antiquities (apart from those on display) which included proto-historic antiquities, terracottas, sculptures, stone and stucco from the Guptas, Mauryas, Sungas, Kushanas, Palas and medieval times. The CAG audit mentioned that storage of these antiquities were not done in adherence to the guiding principles as prescribed by the Handbook on Conservation in Museums. The CAG observed that this..

Indian Supreme Court blasts Archeology department over Taj Mahal

News Analysis | Expressing concern over blue and green patches on the Taj Mahal, the Supreme Court on Wednesday slammed the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) for ‘failure’ to protect it from rising pollution and even wondered whether the body should be relieved of the task to manage the affairs of the world heritage site. A bench of Justices Madan B Lokur and Deepak Gupta said ASI was not properly discharged its duty in maintaining the beauty of Taj Mahal and asked the Centre to consider whether some other agencies be given the responsibility to protect and preserve the 17th-century world heritage site. Advocate A D N Rao, appearing for ASI, told the bench that it was doing whatever is required to protect the monument. He said the patches on Taj were because of insect-breeding in the stagnated water on Yamuna river bed. The court, however, slammed ASI for not accepting the environmental threat to the Taj, saying it was not doing enough to save the monument. The Taj Mahal, liste..

A new Egyptian museum will bring treasures of the pyramids back to practically where...

When Queen Hetepheres I’s tomb was discovered in 1925 near the satellite pyramids of the Great Pyramid of Giza, a large collection of her funeral furniture was taken to display at the Egyptian Museum of Antiquities in central Cairo. The objects from her tomb have been part of one of the most significant collections at the cramped and overflowing museum located near the iconic Tahrir Square — about 12 miles from the Giza plateau where they were found. But nearly 100 years since their discovery, her collection is set to return to where it came from — or at least very close by, to a lavish new mega museum overlooking the pyramids. The Grand Egyptian Museum, which is due to open later this year, is expected to be one of the largest archaeological museums in the world. The star attractionThe museum intends to hold about 100,000 artifacts in total, less than half of which have already been transferred, according to Dr. Tarek Tawfik, director-general of the new museum. The artifacts include ..

Epigraphy crucial source to know Indian history

[unable to retrieve full-text content] Epigraphy crucial source to know Indian history The Hans IndiaFull coverage

The Bones of an Early Jamestown Settler May Soon Be Identified

An old, charred piece of long-forgotten flatbread has captured the interest of archaeologists, anthropologists, and historians around the world. Found in a stone fireplace in Jordan’s Black Desert, this proto-pita dates back 14,400 years, making it the oldest known example of bread, Reuters reports. To put the significance of this discovery in context: the flatbread predates the advent of agriculture by 4000 years, leading researchers to theorize that the laborious process of making the bread fr..

Archaeologists discover 81 ancient settlements in the Amazon

An aerial photo of one of the structures uncovered in a recent study of pre-Columbian archaeological sites in the Amazon. (University of Exeter)The settlement looked like little more than 11 mounds of earth surrounded by a sunken ditch. But if Jonas Gregorio de Souza closed his eyes, he could imagine the Boa Vista site as it would have appeared 800 years ago. Perhaps, the archaeologist said, those mounds were houses circling a central square. Outside the defensive ditch, gardens and fruit trees might have flourished. The mile-long road leading to the enclosure may have had a ritual purpose, its surface hardened by countless ceremonial processions. Or maybe it linked the village to others, forming a chain of communities that crisscrossed the whole southern Amazon basin. There was a time when no archaeologist expected to discover such an elaborate settlement in this relatively resource-poor part of the rain forest. But in a paper published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications, de..

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